Readings: Sabotage, Crap econ model, PRP, and Mass fetishization

PREAMBLE

While it might seem a good idea to relocate to a small town with lovely views, cheap real estate, air service, a decent hospital, and Amazon Prime delivery, you're missing at least one thing. Towns without said thing are a risky destination for you, even if you are crazy enough to build a spreadsheet and spend fifteen years looking.


That thing? A high likelihood of people -- especially young people -- getting hurt in disproportionate numbers. The presence of that cohort -- in a time of aging populations -- brings in expensive doctors, which helps make hospitals viable, which helps make towns viable, which helps make relocatees ... viable.

Viable hospitals matter for health, but they also matter for a local economy. After all, small-town hospitals are often the largest employers in their region, and their disappearance cuts into the economy, as well as scaring off would-be relocators. A double whammy.


This is why small places like Mammoth and Jackson are, perhaps surprisingly, good relocation bets, while, say, Celina, Tennessee, which recently lost its hospital, is much less so. What Celina needs, to my way of thinking, is a few bike parks, a wingsuit club, possibly a thriving surf scene, and maybe an indoor ski hill or a top skate park.

While I'm mostly kidding, I have a genuine point. Towns that want to remain vital and viable in the upcoming Dual Age of Senescence and Remote Work are going to have to move closer to a societal risk frontier, one that they may not like.

HEALTHCARE
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
FINANCE & ECONOMICS
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